Newfoundland Travel - Accommodations: City or Country

Updated: May 2



Are you preparing your Newfoundland travel experience and wondering where to stay? There are many accommodations located throughout the province to meet your needs. Some are located in the uptown and downtown St. Johns districts; others in small communities within a short driving distance of the city; and others in more remote areas of the province. Many rural communities do not have busing services but taxis are available if needed. Geographically, the terrain of the province is mountainous and city streets may be more steeply sloped than visitors are accustomed to. Newfoundlanders drive on the right hand side of the road. If you plan to rent a car during your holiday, it is recommended that you book early to avoid disappointment.

This is the wharf and sea-side houses in the community of Brigus, Newfoundland.
Ocean-front community of Brigus, Newfoundland.

Newfoundland has a close connection to the sea, something which is quite evident in the many communities throughout the province.

Panoramic view of the rural community of Pouch Cove, Newfoundland.
Panoramic view of the rural community of Pouch Cove, Newfoundland.

The rural lifestyle is characterized by a country atmosphere, a higher percentage of older homes, and large-scale property boundaries. A line of freshly hung clothes is commonly seen drying on clotheslines in private yards.

Fisherman lawn display positioned in front of a tree of a private home in Bay Bulls, Newfoundland.
Fisherman lawn display positioned in front of a tree of a private home in Bay Bulls, Newfoundland.

Some Newfoundland homes have creative lawn displays adorning their yards, adding to the community's cultural identity.

Fishing equipment displayed alongside a private home in Petty Harbour, Newfoundland
Fishing equipment displayed alongside a private home in Petty Harbour, Newfoundland

Mom and Pop corner stores and small restaurants (many specializing in fish and chips) can be found in many rural towns but there is often very little else in terms of community businesses. Some communities do not even have banks or grocery stores but share these resources with neighboring communities.

In rural communities, municipal buildings tend to be centrally located outlet buildings.

Panoramic view of the city of St. John's, Newfoundland.
Panoramic view of the city of St. John's, Newfoundland.

In comparison, the city of St. John's has a better infrastructure than that of rural areas. The city has shopping malls, hospitals, gyms, movie theaters, grocery store chains, restaurants, bars, pubs, coffee shops, and a diverse business community. Residential streets are mainly designed for two-lane traffic whereas most highways are designed for four-lane traffic.

Row houses positioned on both sides of the city streets of downtown St. John's, Newfoundland.
Row houses positioned on both sides of the city streets of downtown St. John's, Newfoundland.

The streets of downtown St. John's, the older district of the city, are quite narrow. Many side streets are intended for one way traffic. The row-house residences in downtown St. John's are of an older construction style with private cars parked on street-sides. Houses in uptown St. John's are primarily single home properties. Land boundaries are less generous than most rural homes.


Panoramic view of downtown St. John's, Newfoundland
Panoramic view of downtown St. John's, Newfoundland

Panoramic view of St. John's, Newfoundland
Panoramic view of St. John's, Newfoundland

I hope you find this information helpful as you plan your Newfoundland travel. Please follow my blog to see more.







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Newfoundland Travel Blog-Sandra Murray Photos