Newfoundland Travel Blog - Icebergs

Updated: Feb 17

Many of us spend years "chasing the dream" in our 9 to 5 jobs. This was certainly the case for me but, after my retirement, I saw that life had more possibilities than previously imagined. As a lover of nature and owner of a small vacation rental in Pouch Cove, I often explore the outdoors, take photos, and share my experiences with guests in order to help them plan their vacation. Learn more about icebergs, see the '22 iceberg season predictions, follow the real time iceberg tracker, and have a look through my personal iceberg photo album. #iceberg



The early morning sun casts an illuminating glow on the tall end of an iceberg in the ocean near the Pouch Cove coast.
Discover the beauty of icebergs that float along the coast of Newfoundland from Greenland and Iceland every year.

A trip to Newfoundland's east coast is made more complete when having the opportunity to view icebergs. Few of us realize that these magnificent ice sculptures are the result of compressed snow formed over a period of about 10,000 years and broken off from its parent source! Greenland's glaciers account for 90 percent of the icebergs that arrive on Newfoundland's coast. The remainder are derived from the Arctic. They travel slowly and take several years to reach Newfoundland waters. #icebergs, #newfoundland, #newfoundlandattractions, #nature

Against the horizon, three icebergs in Pouch Cove's harbour make for beautiful photographs.
Three icebergs in Pouch Cove harbour.

If planning a holiday to Newfoundland to see icebergs, it is best to book your trip between May and June. However, the number of icebergs in a given region can vary from year to year and, as with all natural phenomena, there cannot be any accurate predictions related to an iceberg's appearance, abundance, or durability. #newfoundland, #icebergs, #icebergtracking

It is striking to see a distant horizon and deep blue colors of the ocean next to this white iceberg.
The icebergs that migrate to Newfoundland's coast attract hundreds of visitors every year.

No two icebergs are exactly alike and, due to ongoing melting and cracking, no iceberg is the same from day to day.

Snail shaped iceberg bobbing alone in the ocean near the coast of Pouch Cove.
Interestingly, each iceberg has a unique shape and size.

Environmental conditions, such as the early morning sun casting shadows or fog hanging over the surface of an iceberg, create unique opportunities for nature photographers. #naturephotography, #iceberg, #fog

An iceberg in Pouch Cove harbor is illuminated in a luminous glow by the sunrise's orange and pink hues.
Capture the beauty of the early morning sun reflecting off an iceberg that is bobbing serenely in the ocean.

Early morning fog descending on an iceberg along the Pouch Cove coastline.
Early morning fog descending on an iceberg along the Pouch Cove coastline.

Gull flying near an iceberg in Pouch Cove harbour.
Gull flying near an iceberg in Pouch Cove harbour.

Although icebergs are submerged in salt water, they are not salty because they have been formed from frozen snow, a fresh water source. #icebergphotography

Angular iceberg along the coast of Pouch Cove, Newfoundland, displays areas of discoloration and chiseled contours.
The chiseled contours on an iceberg surface are, in part, the result of melting and the mechanical force of waves.

The pure white color of icebergs becomes tainted due to debris deposits on their surface. Through their voyage, mechanical forces such as the impact of ocean waves cause them to become chiseled in appearance. Some icebergs will have blue-green fissure lines, called a "Melt Pond", the result of melting and refreezing of surface ice. #meltpond, #iceberg


This iceberg in Pouch Cove harbour clearly demonstrates surface melting, discoloration, and fissuring.
This iceberg clearly demonstrates surface melting, discoloration, and fissuring.

In this photograph, you can see the cracking, melting, and discolored features of this iceberg. #iceberg

Ice jets of sea water are pushed high into the air by ocean waves that repeatedly hit the surface of this iceberg.
Watch icy ocean waves jet high into the air as wave after wave of north Atlantic ocean waters impact its surface.

Photographing icebergs is quite popular among outdoor photographers. The experience of watching the ocean waves hitting an iceberg at high speed and spraying seawater high into the air a captivating sight. #naturephotography, #iceberg, #icebergs, #oceanspray, #outdoorphotography, #outdoor

The horizon in the background, ocean waves spraying high into the air after impacting with an iceberg in the open sea.
Ocean waves spraying high into the air after impacting with an iceberg in the open sea.

Ocean waves spraying high into the air after impacting with an iceberg close to shore near the coast of Pouch Cove.
Ocean waves spraying high into the air after impacting with an iceberg close to shore near the coast of Pouch Cove.

The iceberg demonstrates how much ice is beneath the surface of the ocean that cannot be seen at eye level above the water.
As seen in this photograph, icebergs have a substantial ice mass on their underside that is not visible from above.

When observing an iceberg, bear in mind that about 90 percent isn't visible from the surface, and the iceberg will be about 30% wider under water. The impact of ocean currents and the uneven distribution of weight are the main reasons that icebergs are physically unstable and can flip at any time. To avoid injury, it is best to watch them from a safe distance.


This iceberg has fracture lines along its upper surface, the result of mechanical forces which are causing it to degrade.
Fracture lines on the top of this iceberg makes it appear sad, as if it recognizes its fate and does not want to disappear.

With time and the impacts of environmental and mechanical factors, icebergs start to degrade. As a result, they break apart and the smaller pieces get carried away.

Drifted ashore, this small fragment from an iceberg, known as a "growler" has a linear melt pond on its surface.
As a piece of a larger iceberg is cleaved away, "Growlers"(such as is pictured here) are formed.

Bergie bits are large fragments (about the size of a house) whereas growlers (such as pictured here) are much smaller. Icebergs continue to degrade along their course and, after a period of about one year, most no longer exist. #growler, #coast

Along the Silver Mines Head hiking trail, two seats overlook the ocean. On this day, an iceberg is seen in the harbour.
Along the Silver Mines Head hiking trail, two seats overlook the ocean. On this day, an iceberg is seen in the harbour.


I'm sure you will agree that iceberg tracking along Newfoundland's coastline is a rewarding experience. Please follow my Newfoundland Travel Blog to see my work on some other popular tourist attractions in eastern Newfoundland. I'd be delighted to hear from you so why not contact me today?



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