Newfoundland Travel - Get to Know the Climate, the Seasons, and the Perks of Each Season

You've booked your trip to "the rock" and are looking forward to an amazing holiday but now you have to decide what to pack and are wondering what the weather may be like during your Newfoundland travel. This guide will be helpful in terms of seasonal temperatures and the timing of the arrival of icebergs, puffins, and whales.

The above photos are representative of the four seasons in Newfoundland.

This is a snow covered field at the edge of the ocean overlooking the Pouch Cove coastline.
This is a snow covered field at the edge of the ocean overlooking the Pouch Cove coastline.

January through March tend to be cold months with temperatures dipping to -15 and wind-chills, at times, as low as the -25 degree Celcius range. For Newfoundland travel, these months are best suited for those who enjoy cold temperatures, snow, and outdoor winter activities.

A drape of low lying fog descends on the coast of Pouch Cove.
A drape of low lying fog descends on the coast of Pouch Cove.

In the months of April through June, the weather conditions tend to be rainy and foggy with temperatures warming to the mid teens.

Sun rising on the horizon and casting reflective shadows atop an iceberg in Pouch Cove harbour.
Sun rising on the horizon and casting reflective shadows atop an iceberg in Pouch Cove harbour.

Icebergs travel through the open sea and arrive in Newfoundland in May to June. There is no guarantee as to the arrival, size or distribution of icebergs in specific communities annually. For those looking to book their Newfoundland travel to coincide with icebergs, the iceberg tracker is a good tool to use to see abundance, size, and distribution of icebergs in real time.


Puffins pairing up on a cliff at the Witless Bay Ecological Reserve in Newfoundland.
Puffins pairing up on a cliff at the Witless Bay Ecological Reserve in Newfoundland.

Temperatures in May often reach the mid teens. Evenings can be quite cooler. There have been dustings of snow in May but the snow tends not to last if it does fall. For those who wish to see the puffins during their Newfoundland travel adventure, it should be noted that puffins begin to arrive at back at their nests by the middle of May, staying until late August.

June is often a foggy and rainy month with temperatures in the mid to high teens. However, as with all seasons, wide fluctuations can occur. As an example, this video shows a rare snowfall in June.

The noon day gun at Cabot Tower on Signal Hill.
The noon day gun at Cabot Tower on Signal Hill.

July and August, our peak summer season, usually see temperatures in the mid 20's and, sometimes, in the low 30's. Evenings tend to be cooler than daytime temperatures.

Pod of whales in Pouch Cove harbour.
Pod of whales in Pouch Cove harbour.

Whales arrive in Newfoundland in late July and stay until September. Accompanying these majestic mammals, there are a greater number of sea birds, including gannets, that can be seen diving for fish that are driven ashore by the whales. Those who wish to see whales should book their Newfoundland travel in this timeframe.

Puffling rescued on a puffin patrol mission.
Puffling rescued on a puffin patrol mission.

In late August, many Atlantic puffin fly off course when leaving their nests, ultimately landing in coastal communities and in need of rescue to be returned to sea. The puffin patrol in Bay Bulls coordinates the puffin rescue and seeks volunteers to help find and capture the birds. The puffling (as baby puffin are called) seen in the above picture was captured, and is being held, by a guest of Murray House Vacation Home who had participated in the puffin patrol during his Newfoundland travel experience.


Autumn colored vegetation at Cape Spear, Newfoundland.
Autumn colored vegetation at Cape Spear, Newfoundland.

September is also a lovely month on the island with temperatures in the high teens. It should be noted that, in places of high elevation such as Signal Hill and Cape Spear, winds tend to be strong and, as a result, temperatures slightly lower than elsewhere.

Reflections of Autumn colored trees atop a tranquil water surface in Shoe Cove.
Reflections of Autumn colored trees atop a tranquil water surface in Shoe Cove.

The Autumn colors of October make amazing subjects for outdoor photography. Temperatures start to rapidly decline and may dip below zero. Jackets are often necessary. On rare occasions, we have experienced snow in late October.

Mummer playing an ugly stick at the entrance to Bowring Park, Newfoundland.
Mummer playing an ugly stick at the entrance to Bowring Park, Newfoundland.

November and December see a continuation of cold temperatures in the general range of -5 to 5 degrees. Snow is not unexpected but, if it occurs, it tends not to stay. Those planning Newfoundland travel during these period should expect damp and cold weather.

Newfoundland and Labrador dog statues at the Geo-Centre, Newfoundland.
Newfoundland and Labrador dog statues at the Geo-Centre, Newfoundland.

The seasonal insights I have outlined above are generalizations only. It is not possible to provide an annual, exact, overview of temperature and climate conditions for Newfoundland. I hope you have enjoyed my post and that you find it helpful in planning your Newfoundland travel itinerary. Don't forget to follow my blog page to see more.


















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